The foolery floating past me & the bumblings of my brain


Stand-up comedy junkie, geek, and closet romantic. Introspectively sexy. Flyyer than your girlfriend, fresher than your crew. 'Bougie', 'siddity', and generally okay with that. But sometimes, I just wanna do hoodrat stuff with my friends. My richness consists not in the extent of my possessions, but in the fewness of my wants. And all I want is simplicity and success. And maybe some more shoes.
katchin05 - May 24, 2014 8:43 AM - Photo
sorayachemaly:

10 Simple Words Every Girl Should Learn
These behaviors, the interrupting and the over-talking, also happen as the result of difference in status, but gender rules.
It’s not hard to fathom why so many men tend to assume they are great and that what they have to say is more legitimate. It starts in childhood and never ends. Parents interrupt girls twice as often and hold them to stricter politeness norms. Teachers engage boys, who correctly see disruptive speech as a marker of dominant masculinity, more often and more dynamically than girls.
For example, male doctors invariably interrupt patients when they speak, especially female patients but patients rarely interrupt doctors in return. Unless the doctor is a woman. When that is the case, she interrupts far less and is herself interrupted more.
This is also true of senior managers in the workplace. Male bosses are not frequently talked over or stopped by those working for them, especially if they are women; however, female bosses are routinely interrupted by their male subordinates.
As adults, women’s speech is granted less authority. We aren’t thought of as able critics or as funny.
Men speak more, more often, and longer than women in mixed groups (classrooms, boardrooms, legislative bodies, expert media commentary and, for obvious reasons religious institutions.)
Indeed, in male-dominated problem solving groups including boards, committees, and legislatures, men speak 75% more than women, with negative effects on decisions reached. That’s why, as researchers summed up, “Having a seat at the table is not the same as having a voice.”
Even in movies and television, male actors engage in more disruptive speech and garner twice as much speaking and screen time as their female peers.
Listserve topics introduced by men have a much higher rate of response.
On Twitter, people retweet men two times as often as women.
The best part though is that we are socialized to think women talk more. Listener bias results in most people thinking that women are hogging the floor when men are actually dominating. Linguists have concluded that much of what is popularly understood about women and men being from different planets, verbally, confuses “women’s language” with “powerless language.”
This preference for what men have to say, supported by men and women both, is a variant on “mansplaining.” The word came out of an article by writer Rebecca Solnit, who explained that the tendency some men have to grant their own speech greater import than a perfectly competent woman’s is not a universal male trait, but the “intersection between overconfidence and cluelessness where some portion of that gender gets stuck.” Solnit’s tipping point experience really did take the cake. She was talking to a man at a cocktail party when he asked her what she did. She replied that she wrote books, and she described her most recent one, River of Shadows: Eadweard Muybridge and the Technological Wild West.The man interrupted her soon after she said the word Muybridge and asked, “And have you heard about the very important Muybridge book that came out this year?” He then waxed on, based on his reading of a review of the book, not even the book itself, until finally a friend said, “That’s her book.” He ignored that friend (also a woman) and she had to say it more than three times before “he went ashen” and walked away. If you are not a woman, ask any woman you know what this is like, because it is not fun and happens to all of us.
Last week as I sat in a cafe, a man in his 60′s stopped to ask me what I was writing. I told him, a book about gender and media and he said, “I went to a conference where someone talked about that a few years ago. I read a paper about it a few years ago. Did you know that car manufacturers use slightly denigrating images of women to sell cars? I’d be happy to help you.” After I suggested, smiling cheerily, that the images were beyond denigrating and definitively injurious to women’s dignity, free speech, and parity in culture he drifted off
In the wake of Larry Summers’ “women can’t do math” controversy several years ago, scientist Ben Barres wrote publicly about his experiences, first as a woman and later in life, as a male. As a female student at MIT, Barbara Barres was told by a professor after solving a particularly difficult math problem, “Your boyfriend must have solved it for you.” When several years after, as Ben Barres, he gave a well-received scientific speech, he overhead a member of the audience say, “His work is much better than his sister’s.”  Most notably, he concluded that one of the major benefits of being male was that he could now “even complete a whole sentence without being interrupted by a man.”
 Really, practice those ten words. 
“Stop interrupting me.” 
“I just said that.”
“No explanation needed.”
 
 

sorayachemaly:

10 Simple Words Every Girl Should Learn

These behaviors, the interrupting and the over-talking, also happen as the result of difference in status, but gender rules.

  • It’s not hard to fathom why so many men tend to assume they are great and that what they have to say is more legitimate. It starts in childhood and never ends. Parents interrupt girls twice as often and hold them to stricter politeness norms. Teachers engage boys, who correctly see disruptive speech as a marker of dominant masculinity, more often and more dynamically than girls.
  • For example, male doctors invariably interrupt patients when they speak, especially female patients but patients rarely interrupt doctors in return. Unless the doctor is a woman. When that is the case, she interrupts far less and is herself interrupted more.
  • This is also true of senior managers in the workplace. Male bosses are not frequently talked over or stopped by those working for them, especially if they are women; however, female bosses are routinely interrupted by their male subordinates.
  • As adults, women’s speech is granted less authority. We aren’t thought of as able critics or as funny.
  • Men speak moremore often, and longer than women in mixed groups (classroomsboardroomslegislative bodiesexpert media commentary and, for obvious reasons religious institutions.)
  • Indeed, in male-dominated problem solving groups including boards, committees, and legislatures, men speak 75% more than women, with negative effects on decisions reached. That’s why, as researchers summed up, “Having a seat at the table is not the same as having a voice.”
  • Even in movies and television, male actors engage in more disruptive speech and garner twice as much speaking and screen time as their female peers.
  • Listserve topics introduced by men have a much higher rate of response.
  • On Twitter, people retweet men two times as often as women.

The best part though is that we are socialized to think women talk more. Listener bias results in most people thinking that women are hogging the floor when men are actually dominating. Linguists have concluded that much of what is popularly understood about women and men being from different planets, verbally, confuses “women’s language” with “powerless language.”

This preference for what men have to say, supported by men and women both, is a variant on “mansplaining.” The word came out of an article by writer Rebecca Solnit, who explained that the tendency some men have to grant their own speech greater import than a perfectly competent woman’s is not a universal male trait, but the “intersection between overconfidence and cluelessness where some portion of that gender gets stuck.” Solnit’s tipping point experience really did take the cake. She was talking to a man at a cocktail party when he asked her what she did. She replied that she wrote books, and she described her most recent one, River of Shadows: Eadweard Muybridge and the Technological Wild West.The man interrupted her soon after she said the word Muybridge and asked, “And have you heard about the very important Muybridge book that came out this year?” He then waxed on, based on his reading of a review of the book, not even the book itself, until finally a friend said, “That’s her book.” He ignored that friend (also a woman) and she had to say it more than three times before “he went ashen” and walked away. If you are not a woman, ask any woman you know what this is like, because it is not fun and happens to all of us.

Last week as I sat in a cafe, a man in his 60s stopped to ask me what I was writing. I told him, a book about gender and media and he said, “I went to a conference where someone talked about that a few years ago. I read a paper about it a few years ago. Did you know that car manufacturers use slightly denigrating images of women to sell cars? I’d be happy to help you.” After I suggested, smiling cheerily, that the images were beyond denigrating and definitively injurious to women’s dignity, free speech, and parity in culture he drifted off

In the wake of Larry Summers’ “women can’t do math” controversy several years ago, scientist Ben Barres wrote publicly about his experiences, first as a woman and later in life, as a male. As a female student at MIT, Barbara Barres was told by a professor after solving a particularly difficult math problem, “Your boyfriend must have solved it for you.” When several years after, as Ben Barres, he gave a well-received scientific speech, he overhead a member of the audience say, “His work is much better than his sister’s.”  Most notably, he concluded that one of the major benefits of being male was that he could now “even complete a whole sentence without being interrupted by a man.”

 Really, practice those ten words

“Stop interrupting me.” 

“I just said that.”

“No explanation needed.”

 

 

(via face-down-asgard-up)

katchin05 - May 24, 2014 8:36 AM - Photoset

black-m3rmaid:

An Infinite List of Favorite Collections - Ezra S/S 2014 Haute Couture

fav color

(via cleauxx)

katchin05 - May 24, 2014 8:35 AM - Photoset

gailsimone:

dbvictoria:

Gail Simone is on a tear on twitter this morning.

I said some stuff.

(via feminist-space)

katchin05 - May 24, 2014 8:34 AM - Text

goddess-river:

Women have been denied the right to vote, treated like property, sold to their spouses, raped every time it was war, misrepresented by entitled old white politicians, been endangered every time they walked somewhere alone at night, denied the right to drive or be anywhere without a man, shamed for showing their faces, shamed for choosing not to show their faces for millennia, and still you think your biggest problem is that someone buys a mug that says “male tears”?

Where can I buy a Male Tears mug?

(via ourgreatdepressionisourlives)

katchin05 - May 24, 2014 8:32 AM - Photoset
katchin05 - May 24, 2014 8:31 AM - Photoset

(I really, REALLY want Elizabeth Warren to run, just FYI)

(Source: sandandglass, via feminist-space)

katchin05 - May 24, 2014 8:29 AM - Text

prongsmydeer:

Plot twist: The tears in Dumbledore’s eyes when seeing the doe patronus were tears of pity. What he was really trying to say with, “After all this time?” is “Dude you haven’t let it go yet?” The memory faded out before we could realize.

"After all this time?”

"Always," said Snape.

"Severus, it’s been years. Get a girlfriend. Please."

(via plotismade)

katchin05 - May 24, 2014 8:02 AM - Video

isolaten:

cutebabe:

shipcomingthrough:

Just watch it.

oh……my fucking

we’re only halfway there and we’ve got 8 days left: please donate. if you can’t, please spread this. it’s an incredible innovation that needs to be heard about.

(via plotismade)

katchin05 - May 24, 2014 7:58 AM - Photo
weian-fu:

Whoever this is really needs to get the hell up out my car.

weian-fu:

Whoever this is really needs to get the hell up out my car.

(Source: codeinelord)

katchin05 - May 17, 2014 7:42 PM - Video

(Source: Spotify)